The Sky Changes by The Hour

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Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan

My Rating: 4 Stars

Beneath a Scarlet Sky captivates your interest. It forced me to ask questions that I later had to find answers to. The preface felt a bit desperate…sorry, but it did pique my interest. Actually when I first heard about this book, I really wanted to read it so much that I couldn’t wait for the publishers to grant my request and so I went ahead and bought it on Amazon. I must still thank Lake Union Publishing however, for granting me an advanced reader’s copy, though a bit late.

This book is about life’s abrupt changes and how we handle them when hope, just like other necessities become scarce and even forgotten. Pino Lella is your typical teenager up until he’s tasked to save Jews from Germans, carry the swastika and unexpectedly become a spy for the partisans. At times of war, it’s a constant choice between ourselves and other people. Who do we save? And so, this reminds me of a famous quote from my country’s National Hero:

“One only dies once, and if one does not die well, a good opportunity is lost and will not present itself again.

Finding love at this time is dangerous, however fate can’t be stopped. We naturally look for sunlight and turn our heads towards it. Pino finds escape with Anna-Marta amidst the war and together they create their own fantasy. It’s tragic, just as what you’d expect from a war novel however the author manages to keep his audience engaged. Although I must admit I did feel like some parts of the book lacked power where it’s needed. Nonetheless, I still learned so much and that’s really all that matters.

Overall, my rating is four stars for its potential and the symphony of love, history, and rich culture. Not recommended for people who aren’t interested in this genre. I do however highly recommend it to WWII fanatics like me. You just have to read this book.